A Typical Day Before Moving To Spain & After Living In Spain

What do you do all day?Many of you keep asking “What do you guys do all day?” We don’t currently have paid jobs, so what could we possibly do to keep busy and prevent us from being bored?  I know it is difficult to believe we are Not Working, but in a sense we really are.  To be honest, we wonder where the time goes and still think that there is not enough time in the day.  We also wish that money grew on trees, but nothing wrong with being dreamers right?   

Pre Sabbatical / Career Break – Life in North Carolina

Time - before SabbaticalA typical school day –  
6:30 am – Wake up, rush to get dressed, fix a quick breakfast
7:15 am – Out the door and kids on the bus by 7:30 am
8:00 am – Arrive at work
8:20 am – Kids start school
3:00 pm – Kids finish school and take bus to YMCA
5:00 pm – (sometimes it was 5:30 pm) Rush to pick up kids at YMCA before 6pm
6:00 pm – (Plus or minus 20 min) Arrive home, Start homework, Start dinner
6:45 pm – Eat Dinner
7:15 pm – Clean up, Finish homework, Watch a little TV, Chores
8:00 pm – Get Kids ready for Bed, Showers etc.
9:00 pm – Kids asleep or close to it,  Some Adult time or more TV
11:00 pm-  To sleep and ready to rinse and repeat the next day

During Sabbatical / Career Break – Life in North Carolina

During Sabbatical

A typical school day –  
8:00 am – Wake up, casually get dressed, fix breakfast
8:42 am – Out the door, walk kids to school (if we drive we leave at 8:52 am)
9:00 am – Kids start school, Alan and I are back home (between 9-2 each day varies for us.  Sometimes we skip all of the work and chores and go out to “play”)
9:00 am – 1:50 pm
Alan and I work (currently unpaid and performed out of passion and love)

    • Wagoners Abroad Blog and Social Media Networking
    • Take on-line courses (Photography, Internet Marketing, Blogging, Entrepreneurship etc)
    • Chores around the house (hand wash dishes, hang laundry to dry, sweep the floors),
    • Plan for next weekend getaway or trip,
    • Work on second blog – An informational site about Almuñécar (work in progress)
    • Work on “Wagoners Abroad Projects” (ebooks, Marketing, Blog Series etc)
    • We run errands around town, go out for a walks
    • Prepare lunch (lots of home cooked meals)

2:00 pm –  We pick the kids up at school
2:15 pm – We are home and sit down together to eat lunch, discuss our days
2:45 pm – We all have a little “chill” time
3:30 pm – Kids work on homework,  Alan and I “work” (respond to emails, social media networking, etc.)
4:30 pm – Kids are outside playing with friends (if homework is complete)
Sometimes we go out for family walks or exploring in the car.
Sometimes we fit in a real “siesta” 🙂
6:00 pm – (Plus or minus 20 min) Arrive home, Start homework, Start dinner
7:30 pm – Eat Dinner
8:00 pm – Clean up, Watch a little TV, Play games
8:30 pm – Get Kids ready for Bed, Hang out with each other, read, play, showers etc.
10:00 pm – Kids asleep or close to it, some adult time, more work or more TV
11:00 pm-  To sleep and ready to rinse and repeat the next day (The beauty – it is rarely the same day twice)

Summary of our Sabbatical while living in Spain

Our life in North Carolina consisted of maybe 3-4 hours of “awake” time with the kids each school/work day.  Often it was in the car or while we were multitasking.  It seemed that “Time” or the Clock was always in our thoughts trying to fit everything in.  We were always in a rush to get to/from somewhere.  Life was full of To Do Lists and we got it done.  Not to mention the care and upkeep of a very large home and yard.

Now living our life in Spain, we have much more quality time with the kids now and we are loving it!  Our days are full of the things we want to do and feel fuller and richer.  We are always having wonderful discussions with the kids and they are exploding with curiosity.  We do have the standard chores of cooking, laundry and cleaning, but it is minimal.  We are renting a furnished apartment, so the upkeep and grounds are taken care of for us.  We can just sit back and enjoy the sea view all day if we like.

I know it appears that we have a routine now and we do to a degree.  We usually just fit everything in to the day somewhere, other than the kid’s school time.  If we don’t fit in what we planned, no biggie there is always another day.  We also have more quality time doing chores, washing dishes, etc as most of it is very manual.  While I don’t love that so much, but it is a very small price to pay for this adventure and we get we tend to do much of that as a family.  Deciding to take a sabbatical was a good choice for us.

The choice of living in Spain was also a good choice for us.  We have simplified and slowed down our pace of life and it works. The kids have so many friends and actually Alan and I do as well.   Of course us adults are very close with many other expats (from several countries), as well as our immediate neighbors.  We are getting to know the parents of our kids friends and are holding our own in Spanish conversation at 3 hour birthday parties. It is pretty comical at times, but everyone is so nice and patient with us.

What would you do if you had “free time” every day?

Our Top 5 Reasons to Take a Sabbatical

6 Months Living in Spain – What were we thinking?

6 Months Living in Spain – What do the kids think?

16 thoughts on “A Typical Day Before Moving To Spain & After Living In Spain

  1. Your pre-departure schedule looked exactly like ours, except we also had classes for our daughter and ourselves on some evenings and weekends. We are really enjoying our relaxed lifestyle so much more since we started our RTW trip. We keep telling ourselves that we never want to return to our old life before we started.

    • Hey there Jason. Glad to see you here. 🙂

      Yes, I bet the pre departure is pretty routine. We are loving it too and can’t even think about going back. We will put that off as long as possible. We will be a bit more mobile while the kids are on summer holiday and then we will see how we can swing staying in Spain for the next school year. Then who knows, maybe more of the RTW style…. need to seriously figure out the funding for all of this, but he once you are on the road you get a little creative. Thanks for visiting us and look forward to more comments from you.

  2. i love getting a real life glimpse into your daily life. i love the casual routine, the time to breathe and do and be from passion and not from the constant rush. i love it. i recently wrote a post also answering: what do you do all day? i guess it is fascinating what people do when they have space to choose. lovely little life you have there. is school in spanish or english?

    • Hey Gabi, thanks for stopping by. It is funny that is the question of choice for so many. I suppose if I asked them all the same question, they would have a rough time describing it as well. We do love the we created this life where we have choices and will enjoy it as long as we can. The kids go to a Spanish public school and are now pretty fluent. That was one of the main reasons we chose Spain and that Magic has paid off. They were confident with Spanish in February (only 6 months in to the journey), but now they said they don’t even translate in their minds. They just know what people are saying. Alan and I are quite as fluent as them, but it is great.

  3. Great to see you can fit in a lot more family time even with school. We’re homeschoolers, so all that is a bit alien to us. I love the fact that when you’re travelling you have so many less possessions, hence fewer chores, life just becomes simpler!

    • Oh Alyson you have it so right! Fewer possessions is key. School here is Southern Spain is only from 9-2, so it goes by quickly. It seems there is a holiday for every occasion and we hit the road every time and many weekends. Homeshcooling will likely be our next step if we can continue our journey beyond Spain next year. How many hours a day/week do you homeschool? I need to begin researching that aspect, to plan for next year.

  4. Wow this sounds great! My day isn’t nearly as productive and I really have no excuses. I don’t even have kids. ( though to be fair I am kind of a kid.) It’s more like sleep, wake up, take a nap, sleep some more and eat.

    • Oh Priya, we too have days as you describe. Not to often, but we do. The best part is we can choose when we want to have those days and believe me it is much easier to do in the winter. Thanks for stopping by!

  5. Your kids are always going to appreciate this extra time you are spending with them. So glad you are following your passions!

  6. Oh ah, I think the magic lies in the “not having to go to work” part haha! If you have to go to work, life, I think, is the same all over the world: never have enough time, stress stress stress, always have to be running around, always have to be someplace on time, etc.

    • Haha, agreed!

      At home I would spend free time reading, eating, maybe watching a movie. On the road, it’s usually blogging or planning our next steps.

      • But doesn’t it seem more fun on the road? I get so excited about planning the next adventure (really the ongoing adventure). Only sometimes do the blog posts feel like work. They do take a Looong time to write sometimes, but we are also capturing memories of our time too.

  7. Sounds like you’re managing a much more relaxed routine now; having more time with the kids must be great. Having been on the road for about three months now Andrew and I are just getting used to having lots of ‘free’ time. Like you, we still find we have so much to do in terms of writing for the blog and editing videos – my freelance work also takes up time and requires extreme discipline!

    • Hi Amy! Yes, it is interesting how life can take it turns and we just fill up our time. I love writing for our blog and sharing our experiences, so it doesn’t feel like work. That is along as we stay ahead of the curve and have a few things written in the hopper. Without a doubt, the pictures and videos are what consume the most time.

      What kind of freelance work do you do?

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