Adventures with Anya in Hanoi Vietnam

Let me take you on my adventure through Hanoi Vietnam!  We cruise around town on an electric car, visit the Hỏa Lò Prison, walk on the Long Biên Bridge, and get in a little culture at the Thang Long Water Puppet Theatre.

Adventures with Anya Hanoi Vietnam

This is more of a vlog (video log) rather than a blog post, so you will just need to watch and listen.  We do provide a little more information about these Hanoi locations below.  We were in Hanoi for 5 nights and stayed in the Old Quarter of town.  This was pretty much the tourist area, but it was good for us.  It was cold and rained a little too.

 Come along with Anya in Hanoi Vietnam

Note from Heidi (Anya filmed this herself, so apologies for the lack of stability)

 

Hanoi Electric Car
Hanoi Vietnam  Electric Car

We had fun on our 1 hour sightseeing tour around Hanoi’s Old Quarter and Hoan Kiem Lake area.  This is very close to the Thang Long Water Puppet Theatre.  We tried to flag one down for a ride, but nobody would pick us up.  After a while we realized there was a special place to start the tour.

Ticket info:  The ticket stall is located on Dinh Tien Hoang Street.  This is the tree-lined boulevard, right next to Hoan Kiem Lake and the (weekend) walking street. The price we were quoted was per car load, regardless of the number of people.
Cost:  It was 150,000 Dong ($7) for 30 minutes or 200,000 Dong ($9.50) for 1 hour.
More info about electric car tour in Hanoi.

The Hỏa Lò Prison  – Hanoi Hilton
Prision Hanoi Vietnam

We went to the prison and it was very sad to see what people went through. The prison was originally built by the French to hold the Vietnamese people.  I remember reading about how there was about 200 girls and most of them were older and they were in one tiny little room. Later it was used to hold prisoners from the Vietnam War.  In one room you could see how they tied the prisoners feet down and they couldn’t really move around.  There were also some stalls where they didn’t have any light, just cement walls.  It was very dark and very sad.

Ticket info:  You can buy your tickets there at the gate of the Maison Central (the original name of the prison) in the Hoan Kiem District.
They are open from 8 am – 4:30 pm.  
Cost:  10,000 Dong ( $.50 ) kids are free

Walk on the Long Biên Bridge

The bridge was very long and rusty.  It could have people on motorcycles and pedestrians, but not much room for you to walk.  Be careful where you step, because the cement blocks move a little.  I liked walking with my family across the bridge.  We didn’t go the entire way because it was very very cold and too long.  In the video I say it is over the Mekong River, but it is really the Red River.  Oops!

Cost:  Free

Thang Long Water Puppet Theatre
Thang Long Water Puppet Theatre

I liked the show, but it was a little bit long for me.  It was 45 minutes, but I think 30 would have been good.  We had to buy the 100,000 Dong ($5) tickets because the 60,000 Dong ($3) tickets were sold out.  I think it was worth about $2.  I could see the sticks in the water to make the puppets move, but it was still neat to see part of the Vietnamese culture.

Ticket info:  You can buy at the theatre in advance or same day.  It is also in the Old Quarter of Hanoi in the Hoan Kiem District.  Very close to the electric car stand.
Cost:  100,000 Dong ($5) for seats closer to the stage and 60,000 Dong ($3) for seats higher up.  I think the higher seats are better.  It wasn’t crowded when we were there, so we actually moved to the chairs on the side so we could be close.

Click the picture below for more.
Adventures_with_Anya_image

Hanoi Vietnam Old Quarter

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4 thoughts on “Adventures with Anya in Hanoi Vietnam

  1. We absolutely love seeing what kinds of adventures your family gets up to on your travels. Since our home base is here in Hanoi,Vietnam, we especially loved this post that highlights some of those cultural oddities we tend to take for granted here at the Buffalo Tours office… especially that incredible corner that’s perfect for traffic spotting!

    Keep up the great posts. Love hearing about your time here!

    • Oh that is great Karen. We should have looked you up while we were there, shoot! Thanks for commenting and following along with our adventures. We absolutely loved that intersection. We would cross back and forth in the traffic, just because we could! It gave us all the biggest thrill, not to mention improving our traffic crossing skills.

  2. Very cool stuff guys!

    I for one loved Hanoi.

    I also hung out in that same exact intersection.

    We had a neat time there. First we stayed in a spot not quite as advertised. OK, roaches were present – I mean a BUNCH – and it was older and more run down than presented on the web. We moved from there to the tourist spot – a few blocks from that intersection – and loved it.

    Daily walks by the lake, and we hoofed it to watch movies at the nearby – I mean far away – mall. Hanoi was a blast.

    As for the motorbike situation I read 2 million as the last count in Hanoi. I’m not surprised. We spend minutes crossing wide highways. 1 step at a time. Take that step, stop, everybody drives around you, then the next step, stop, continue. I’ve not experienced anything like this anywhere on earth.

    Even at the lights motorbikes piled up on sidewalks trying to get around the traffic. Which meant we had no space to walk during red lights by intersections. We waited and smiled at the insane scene.

    Thanks guys for the trip down memory lane!

    Ryan

    • We know what you mean about the roaches. More to come on that topic soon! 🙂 Glad you liked it. We just loved hanging out at that intersection and going into the buildings surrounding it. Of course trying to find the ideal spot to take a photo and some video. It was great.

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