Through the Eyes of the Traveling Child – Miro from Raising Miro

This is interview number five in our series Through the Eyes of the Traveling Child”. Look who responded to our interview!  It is Miro, what an honor.

Miro (age 14) and his Mom have been experiencing the life of travel for over 4 years.  Let’s see what he has to say about his experiences:

Miro from Raising Miro

Miro from Raising Miro

Through the Eyes of the Traveling Child – Miro from Raising Miro

Provide us with a little background on who you are.
My name is Miro, and I left the states about 4 years ago with my mom. We were growing sick of the consumerist bullshit that we had to put up with day in and day out. So we left, never to look back. Why would we look back? Our current lives are much better.

Where do you call home?
Well, home is where the heart is, and the heart is currently in Cusco, Peru

Miro in Cusco Peru

Miro in Cusco Peru

What do you like most about traveling? The freedom. The freedom definitely makes it. The option to go here, or maybe there; There’s nothing like it.

How long have you been traveling and where have you lived so far?
We recently started our 5th year on the road. With 5 years on the road, you’d think I’d been everywhere, but actually I’ve only been to 13 countries. We’ve lived in many places, but the most memorable are Guatemala, Panama and (now)  Peru.

Miro in an Inca Graveyard

Miro in an Inca Graveyard

What have you learned from your travels thus far?
My eyes have been opened to the culture; The different ways people live. The history, the customs. I guess you could call it anthropology. I’ve learned a lot by observing the people.

Tell us about how you are receiving your education?
Well, some could say I don’t receive an education, but really I learn simply from living. I’m an unschooler; I draw the education from real life experiences. I’ve learned about a wide slue of topics, such as: World politics, cryptozoology, ethnobotany and world history.  You
can’t get that from school.

How many languages can you speak and at what level? Was it difficult to learn?
I currently speak two languages, English and Spanish (Three, if you count gibberish). English is my native language, and learning Spanish wasn’t too difficult, I speak at a fluent level. I learnt it by listening, I never took a single class. Immersion works wonders, eh?

Do you have many friends?
I wouldn’t use the word ‘many’. I have friendships from all over, but the most notable and (possibly the strongest) is a friend I met online. He’s a traveling unschooler as well, and we share many common interests. We’ve never met in person.

What has been your favorite adventure?
My favorite adventure is a psychological one. I’d much rather stay inside with a book. My apologies if this is a boring answer. Alas, tis the truth.
Miro-Art

Do you have a favorite game you play when you travel?
The ‘What am I?’ Game helps whittle away the hours on the long bus rides. One person chooses someone or something to be, and the others have to ask yes or no question to figure out what they are.  I’m always a cuddlefish. Shhh, don’t tell anyone.

Miro Juggles

Miro Juggles

Is there anything you miss seeing, having, doing?
Fast internet may not be at the top of the list, but it is definitely up there. I would have to say the thing I miss the most is Mexican food. Surprisingly, you can’t find it down here.

What is the one thing you are happy you brought with you?
This may sound childish, but I’m glad I brought my teddy bear. It reminds me of times long past, like an ancient relic. It reminds me of when life was simple(r).

Do you have your own blog or write about your experiences?
I have a column on our website: Raising Miro. The column is entitled Miro Unedited. I’m also starting a writing project, entitled 100 Stories, 100 Days, where I write a short story a day. You can find them in my column.

Miro from Raising Miro

Miro from Raising Miro

 Miro,  Thank you for sharing with all of us! 

 

We often are asked about what the kids think of their experience as a traveling child and how things are going.  Do they have friends, how are they being educated and are they social?  We thought these are likely questions for all types of families, so we decided to start a family travel interview series “Through the Eyes of the Traveling Child”. 

We don’t often get exposed to the opinion of the kids and perhaps think we should.  We all know the Wagoner kids are full of their two cents worth and are loving travel.   If you would like to read other interviews in our Traveling Child Series, just click the image below.

Through the eyes of the traveling Child Interview Series.  We often are asked about what the kids think of their experience as a traveling child and how things are going.  Do they have friends, how are they being educated and are they social?  We thought these are likely questions for all types of families, so we decided to start a family travel interview series “Through the Eyes of the Traveling Child”.  We don’t often get exposed to the opinion of the kids and perhaps think we should.  We all know the Wagoner kids are full of their two cents worth and are loving travel.   If you would like to read other interviews in our Traveling Child Series visit WagonersAbroad.com

Thanks for following along!  Do you have a traveling child who would like to be part of our series?  Just let us know.

1 thought on “Through the Eyes of the Traveling Child – Miro from Raising Miro

  1. Hi Miro!

    You have quite a depth to your answers, nothing at all like a regular 14-year old!

    The way you express yourself is very mature and thoughtful. I wonder if it’s a result of all your travels, or a benefit of the “unschooling” you’re doing. Perhaps a combination of the two? I enjoyed reading your answers, and will make sure to follow your blog from now on 🙂

    Very interesting interview, thanks!

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